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Thumbnail to Stone sculptor, stone mason & master craftsman Scott Taylor commissioned to clean & restore the Tympanum and Archivolt at the Catholic Church The Holy Spirit and St Edward in Swanage. This deep carved Lepine Limestone relief had suffered a thick crust of sooty dirt accumulated over one hundred years or so. The soft nature of this material required a gentle approach to remove the hard, black carbon and calcite crust without damaging the material below. Thumbnail to Stone sculptor, stone mason & master craftsman Scott Taylor was commissioned by the owners of a beautiful 1905 Purbeck stone house because they wished to restore a window that had been crudely converted to a doorway in the sixties. Scott matched the rustic dressed walling below and ‘spliced’ in the window mullions and sill. The lime mortar pointing was traditional hydraulic lime and the stones bedded on mature lime putty. The stooling on the window head/lintel had been roughly hacked away leaving the need for some tricky joint work. Thumbnail to Stone sculptor, stone mason & master craftsman Scott Taylor Thumbnail to Stone sculptor, stone mason & master craftsman Scott Taylor Thumbnail to Stone sculptor, stone mason & master craftsman Scott Taylor designed this striking ammonite mosaic of black and white pebbles for an  exclusive waterfront Sandbanks property. The eye catching central feature reflects  the circular Portland Stone terracing and infinity pool.
I am also able to design and produce complementary features such as fireplaces, sometimes referred to as chimney pieces, corbels, porches and porticos, date and name plaques.
I rarely produce and install granite kitchen worktops as the uniform nature of these generally suits production companies with a range of automated, robotic, equipment.
I have produced specialist kitchens and bathrooms using super-light granite and marble veneers of less than 5mm thickness mounted on aluminium honeycomb substrates. These were fitted to Sunseeker and Princess super yachts. I have extensive knowledge on the use of composite structures and associated materials.

If you have a specialist requirement and have been disappointed by the response from factory production outfits, give me a call, I may be able to help.

STONE WINDOW REINSTATED: The owners of this beautiful 1905 Purbeck stone house wished to restore a window that had been crudely converted to a doorway in the sixties. I matched the rustic dressed walling below and ‘splice’ in the window mullions and sill. The lime mortar pointing was traditional hydraulic lime and the stones bedded on mature lime putty. The stooling on the window head/lintel had been roughly hacked away leaving the need for some tricky joint work.
Stone sculptor, stone mason & master craftsman Scott Taylor was commissioned by the owners of a beautiful 1905 Purbeck stone house because they wished to restore a window that had been crudely converted to a doorway in the sixties. Scott matched the rustic dressed walling below and ‘spliced’ in the window mullions and sill. The lime mortar pointing was traditional hydraulic lime and the stones bedded on mature lime putty. The stooling on the window head/lintel had been roughly hacked away leaving the need for some tricky joint work.
SCOTT TAYLOR stone sculptor
Bath Stone in Bournemouth Area: My workshop is situated near to the Bournemouth, Poole and Christchurch conurbation, a large number of the buildings in the area date to the mid to late Victorian era.
A sample of Bath Stone, Stoke Ground Base Bed,the material mined by Bath Stone Group is extensively used throughout the UK and beyond in both new build and restoration projects.The material is regularly specified by English Heritage, The National Trust and The Royal Household. Scott Taylor stone sculptor & stone mason has vast experience with tradional & modern building construction methods & conservation in natural stonework, masonry & sculpture, including listed buildings, ecclesiatical buildings & churches
Bath Stone was the most widely used material, often through a catalogue of designs and ready-made products, brought in by rail, direct from the Bath area.

left: sample of Bath Stone, Stoke Ground Base Bed, more info:-
Bath Stone Group

Causes of Natural Stone Erosion: There are several actions that conspire to erode natural stone. This is a complex field that in the case of valuable historic buildings requires in-depth laboratory testing and extensive surveys. I have decades of experience working in this area and most problems and solutions are similar to those I have dealt with previously.
This photo was taken by Scott Taylor stone sculptor, stonemason & master craftsman as part of an inspection to compile a report on St John’s Church in Boscombe, Bournemouth, Dorset, UK and is a clear example of the various stages of salt erosion

above:This photo was taken as part of an inspection to compile a report on St John’s Church in Boscombe and is a clear example of the various stages of salt erosion.

Decay caused by Inappropriate Repair: Many of the worst cases of decay are caused by inappropriate repair work in the past.
This photo was taken by Scott Taylor stone sculptor, stonemason & master craftsman and shows the stone behind the hard cement repairs has turned to powder and washed down the face of the bricks below. Bath Stone is relatively soft and highly absorbent; these qualities make it particularly susceptible to salt erosion. The salt is partly windblown from the sea, the building is situated near the sea fron in Bournemouth, Dorset,UK, but also comes from air pollution and poor quality coal fired lime used in the initial construction. Where these salts gather in high concentrations the stone will rapidly decay.
You can see from the picture above, the stone behind the hard cement repairs has turned to powder and washed down the face of the bricks below. Bath Stone is relatively soft and highly absorbent; these qualities make it particularly susceptible to salt erosion. The salt is partly windblown from the sea but also comes from air pollution and poor quality coal fired lime used in the initial construction. Where these salts gather in high concentrations the stone will rapidly decay.
The use of hard sand and cement mortar traps the salt and can concentrate it further; this will turn the stone, literally to dust, behind the repair. The same effect can happen when Bath Stone is painted. Fortunately paint tends to quickly blister off salt contaminated stone before too much damage can be done.
This photo was taken by Scott Taylor stone sculptor, stonemason & master craftsman and shows the decay caused when Bath Stone is painted. The concentric rings around this paint blister show where it has re-occured time and again following coats of paint being applied without appropriate preparation. There are instances where it is not practical to remove paint from an entire building and particular attention needs to be paid to reduce the effects of salt.
above: Close-up conconcentric rings around paint blister
The concentric rings around this paint blister show where it has re-occured time and again following coats of paint being applied without appropriate preparation. There are instances where it is not practical to remove paint from an entire building and particular attention needs to be paid to reduce the effects of salt. Other inappropriate treatments include painting the stone with cement grout and various waterproofing sealers that are designed for cement and brick, not limestone.

I have compiled reports on buildings, based on my practical experience, for clients to use as a basis for planning repair schedules and gathering like for like quotations. I am not a qualified surveyor however and any report should not be considered as a replacement for a qualified survey.







The Repair of Damaged Stone: It is not just a question of using the correct mortar to repair stone.The typical blister shape of failed stone will allow repair mortar to simply fall out in time. The decayed stone must be cut back to allow the soft mortar to key.
By cutting the edges of the repair square the mechanical key will prevent failure. This example of stone repair, see picture below, was reinforced with stainless steel wire, mesh and dowel, particularly needed on large sections of renovation. Where the condition of the remaining stone is poor or a large percentage of the volume is lost, it can be preferable to replace the stone completely.
his photo was taken by Scott Taylor stone sculptor, stonemason & master craftsman and shows the decayed Bath Stone cut back to allow the soft mortar to key. By cutting the edges of the repair square the mechanical key will prevent failure. This example of stone repair was reinforced with stainless steel wire, mesh and dowel, particularly needed on large sections of renovation. Where the condition of the remaining stone is poor or a large percentage of the volume is lost, it can be preferable to replace the stone completely.
Dealing with Rainwater
Stonemasonry is an ancient craft with centuries of acquired knowledge in dealing with rainwater. Decorative mouldings serve a practical function beyond ornamentation. Rainwater is prevented from running down the face of the building by shaping the stone so it drips off. ‘Drips’ as they are known, are still used on modern plastic windowsills and doorsteps.
This photo was taken by Scott Taylor stone sculptor, stonemason & master craftsman and shows shows the weathered Bath Stone stone above the drip where paint has quickly lifted preventing deep decay. Below the drip however, salt erosion (the building is sited near the sea-front in Bournemouth Dorset UK) beneath the paint has caused extensive damage.
The photo above, shows the weathered stone above the drip where paint has quickly lifted preventing deep decay, below the drip however, salt erosion beneath the paint has caused extensive damage.
Problems caused by filled in 'Drips' All too often I find, where stone has been repaired, the drips have been filled. This can lead to water ingress, accelerating decay in the stone or brick below and causing damp and decay within the building.
Another common cause for damaged stonework is steel and iron. The Victorians developed building methods that used steel girders to make an internal frame with stone cladding on the outside. Any steel embedded in stone, if it is not adequately protected, will rust. When steel and iron rusts it expands as the crust of rust grows. The action is inexorable and even a single iron dowel can shatter a large block of stone in time.

While my services may not appeal to a quick-turnaround building developer the medium and long term benefits are manifold:
  • The integrity of the building is maintained
  • The costly process of repainting stonework every five years is eliminated
  • The aesthetic beauty of natural stone is retained
  • Failing and falling masonry is avoided
  • Secondary decay such as mildew, dry or wet rot is avoided

 





 

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BUILDING REPAIR RESTORATION & NEW BUILD

EXTENSION TO VICTORIAN HOUSE: An example of a small extension to a large Victorian house where the stone and brickwork matched the original. I supplied and dressed the stone and the main contractor provided installation.
I am familiar with both traditional and modern construction methods for stonework and can offer design suggestions and solutions for new build and extensions. I have extensive experience with listed buildings, churches & ecclesiastic buildings & sculpture and I am happy to work with conservation officers to achieve a satisfactory project conclusion for you and future generations.

Stone sculptor, stone mason & master craftsman Scott Taylor commissioned to clean & restore the Tympanum and Archivolt at the Catholic Church The Holy Spirit and St Edward in Swanage. This deep carved Lepine Limestone relief had suffered a thick crust of sooty dirt accumulated over one hundred years or so. The soft nature of this material required a gentle approach to remove the hard, black carbon and calcite crust without damaging the material below.
CLEANING & RESTORATION: TheTympanum and Archivolt at the Catholic Church The Holy Spirit and St Edward in Swanage: This deep carved Lepine Limestone relief had suffered a thick  crust of sooty dirt accumulated over one hundred years or so. The soft nature of this material required a gentle approach to remove the hard, black carbon and calcite crust without damaging the material below.
I was commissioned to clean and re-carve the relief sculpture in areas to restore this tympanum and archivolt at St Mary's church, Swanage.
I was commissioned to clean and re-carve the relief sculpture in areas to restore this typanum and archivolt at St Mary's church, Swanage.
AMMONITE MOSIAC: I designed this striking mosaic of black and white pebbles for an exclusive waterfront Sandbanks property. The eye catching central feature reflects the circular Portland Stone terracing and infinity pool.
Stone sculptor, stone mason & master craftsman Scott Taylor designed this striking ammonite mosaic of black and white pebbles for an  exclusive waterfront Sandbanks property. The eye catching central feature reflects  the circular Portland Stone terracing and infinity pool.